Thursday, February 10, 2011

Lord of the Rings! ...auf Deutsch

6 comments
We just caught part of the third Lord of the Rings movie on TV. The German name for Mount Doom is Schicksalsberg. Somehow, it just doesn't have the same ring to it. It almost sounds like a nice place!

6 comments:

  1. I watched part of one of those movies last week with my German boyfriend and it was super-strange watching it in German. The weirdest part was hearing them say "ihr" to almost everybody, even just to one person (usually it's plural!) - I asked my boyfriend what was up with that. He said it was the old-fashioned way to show respect, more than the Sie form. Crazy, right?

    I didn't catch the name Schicksalsberg, but you're right - haha - it does sound kind of like a nice place!

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  2. I watched part of one of those movies last week with my German boyfriend and it was super-strange watching it in German. The weirdest part was hearing them say "ihr" to almost everybody, even just to one person (usually it's plural!) - I asked my boyfriend what was up with that. He said it was the old-fashioned way to show respect, more than the Sie form. Crazy, right?

    I didn't catch the name Schicksalsberg, but you're right - haha - it does sound kind of like a nice place!

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  3. Oops, I accidentally posted the same comment twice! Sorry!

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  4. You know what really freaks me out? That in the German LotR Shelob is called Kankra. What the hell? At least Kankra sounds appropriately evil and all.

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  5. There's actually an explanation for "Kankra": The translator, Margaret Carroux, back in the 60s used Tolkien's original translation notes. The movie dub uses Carroux' translation.

    Shelob is actually "she" and "lob" (obsolete word for spider, from olde english "lobbe") written together.
    The translator therefore used a traditional older German word for spider ("Kanker"), and changed it to sound female - Kankra.

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  6. Well.... I think all dubbed movies must sound strange to native speakers of the original language. But I bet in the case of "The Lord of the Rings" it must be especially strange since it is such a stilted old-fashioned language.

    By the way: Did you know that Tolkien even preferred the German word "Elben" that Carroux came up with over the original "elves"? He always hated it that many English readers compared the Elves with tradtional elves, tiny creatures with wings. He thought that "Elben" had a much better ring to it and fit the Elvish race perfectly.

    Unfortunately, I cannot give you a source where I found this since it has been a long time ago that I read it but I always found this to be a rather amusing bit of trivia.

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