Thursday, February 12, 2009

Can you read it?

20 comments



Click on them to enlarge. Please ignore my spelling error(s?). There is at least one!

20 comments:

  1. Altdeutsche Schrift, also known as Suetterlin.

    Should be required of all newcomers and immigrants :)

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  2. Unfortunately I can't read all of it. I used to know it better because when I was younger I taught myself to write it, but I haven't used / read / practiced it in forever.
    But I wonder why Anonymous thinks it should be required of all newcomers and immigrants? I am pretty sure 99% of Germans younger than 40 can't read it either.

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  3. No clue what it say, It look foreign to me! ;-b But then... I am only French so anything look foreign! ;-) What is it? And most of all what does it say?

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  4. That was brutal. I think the c's messed me up the most. But even the post somewhat removed from the loop in the 'a' made for head-scratching. I like the knowing that those 'e' characters are the basis for modern umlauts. I guess I like 'f' the best because the deviation from my expectation was the least among all you used.

    Good thing the word verification captchas don't use that script.

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  5. Oh, and I'll take the 'brettchen,' if I won.

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  6. That is so cool!!! For me the hardest letter to identify was the "e" and the prettiest was the "w". Is this still in active use in many places?

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  7. Cliff, you win :) And conveniently I already have your address! Thanks for giving it a shot!

    Jen, I can only think of one place where I have seen it currently used.

    I find the 'e' to be the worst! That is a key letter in trying to decipher something, and it doesn't bear any resemblance to 'e' as I know it! And I love the 'v' and 'w'. I'd love to hear anyone else's answers too. :) Will post more on it later when I get some time! This was a nice exercise yesterday to get my mind off other things.

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  8. Hey,

    I found your blog through Ian's a few days ago and spend almost all tuesday reading through it (a lot of spare time certainly is on the up side of being sick). I quite enjoy your writing (apprently).


    Anyway, regarding the post: I was finally able to read it. The 'e' and 'c' were putting me off the most; and the fact that the line of the 'a' was somwhat detached (as Cliff said) didn't make it easy as well.

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  9. I am having a lot of trouble reading this. However, I have trouble backing down from a challenge so I will contimue to study this until I a. figure it out b. my brain explodes. Hopefully, it will be a!

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  10. Welcome, Mo!

    I think with more practice my 'a's could become easier to read - with a closer stem. As it stands they look just like the combination 'oc'!

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  11. OMG you actually tried to write Sütterlin? I once read somebody's English homework from the '30s (a student's dad) and I barely understood it!

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  12. Wow, I didn't understand that at all, but like "sara of the hinterland" said, it sure was pretty! (maybe it's a Sara/Sarah thing)

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  13. I am impressed. Your Suetterlin is better than mine hahahaha.

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  14. Arashi: Says the woman who learns languages for fun...;) I like calligraphy so new handwritings suit me!

    Sarah: I think it's pretty too. :)

    Nelly: Did you have to learn it or just do it for fun?

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  15. How are you learning it? Is someone teaching you?

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  16. Kelsey, I was on a site called Omniglot - it has lots of information for various languages around the world!

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